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BDR

Limited investment capital and planning for trouble

Limited investment capital and planning for trouble

Small businesses often fail to take the time to make business continuity plans. One aspect of a business continuity plan involves developing plans to handle the loss of physical infrastructure and hardware. Unfortunately, smaller and younger firms often fail to address these issues because they lack the necessary capital to invest in additional or supplemental equipment. Redundant servers, battery back systems or uninterruptible power supplies, and data backup systems that allow for offsite backup storage are the most obvious examples.

These can represent considerable capex for a small firm. However, these costs need to be weighed against the costs that would be incurred if a severe business interruption occurred. Encouragingly, new technology is creating tools for redundancy and data protection that don’t require additional hardware investments. The cloud is probably the single biggest savior for small businesses looking to defend against business interruption events. The cloud means you can offload many of your business processes and infrastructure to the cloud and sidestep creating expensive redundancies on your own. Offsite data storage, increased efficiencies as a result of shared data center costs, SaaS, and even data collaboration tools are added cost savings that can be provided by the cloud.

So before you throw up your hands and say you cannot afford to address business continuity, take another look. The cloud can redefine the paradigm of “business continuity.”

Fully Managed Backup & Disaster Recovery

Fully Managed Backup & Disaster Recovery

Fully Managed Backup & Disaster Recovery

If the power in your office fails tonight, and all of your computers crash, how quickly can you recover? And more importantly, at what cost? According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 93% of companies that experience a disaster go out of business within 5 years – even if they can recover in the short term.

We’re here to ensure your business doesn’t become another statistic. Our business continuity solution is about more than just backup – it’s designed to quickly revive your network following any unplanned downtime, and ensure your employees are operating productively in almost no time at all.

 

• Complete end-to-end management of backups

• Block-level encryption

• Continuous Data Protection technology

• Fully-managed & monitored

• Cloud replication

• Off-site virtualization

 

Unparalleled Peace of Mind

In today’s always-on business landscape, maintaining an effective backup and disaster recovery (BDR) strategy is becoming more important than ever before. Data is playing an increasingly critical role in decision-making processes, and the costs and risks associated with downtime are skyrocketing – not to mention the damage your brand and reputation can suffer in the event of a disaster.  

Net DirXions’s business continuity solution includes features like continuous data protection, cloud-based replication and recovery, and more – all for one low fixed monthly price per protected server.

What does that mean? It means you can rest easy knowing that your critical data, emails, reports, and other information are all protected, backed up and securely tucked away until you need them. 

Direct Support

Having a backup appliance in place is only the first step in a successful business continuity strategy. To minimize the risk of data loss as much as possible, you’ll want to have technicians proactively monitoring the entire backup process to ensure things are working as expected.

That’s why we’ve got a dedicated team keeping a watchful eye over your protected servers, ready to jump into action should any problems arise. And if the worst should happen, don’t worry – we’ll have you back up and running quickly.

Disaster Recovery Plans: Do You Have One?

Disaster Recovery Plans: Do You Have One?

Disaster Recovery Plans: Do You Have One?

Disaster recovery and business continuity plans are issues that almost all small businesses fail to think about. More frequently, they decide they haven’t the resources to address such “unthinkables.”

If your business was down for 1-2 days or more, what costs would you incur?

Lost revenues and lost productivity. These are obvious. You won’t make the money that you would have if you remained open. This is especially true if you provide a service. Services are inherently tied to time, and time cannot be re-created. Sure, you can work extra hours next week, but it won’t be a service provided at the time it was expected. However, even if you provide a product that can be purchased next week instead of today, a customer didn’t get it when they most wanted or needed it.

There are other far more serious consequences of business downtime than just unsold goods and services. There are the intangibles that can’t be so easily measured but have long-term consequences. For example

Helping the competition – You give your competition a real edge. Present clients and potential ones may go to a competitor while you are down. Not all will return. Your competitors now have ammunition against you to use in sales pitches.

Employee frustration – Employees will carry the burden of the extra hours and stress of helping get things back together. That can lead to a lot of frustration, which if things don’t get back to normal quickly, can damage long-term productivity. Most importantly, it can damage the respect they have for management (that means you). In general, they will recognize that you didn’t have the foresight and wisdom to anticipate the need to create disaster recovery and continuity plans. How can that not damage their trust and support for the company and you?

Negative brand reputation –Your customers will also wonder how you couldn’t have cared enough to make plans to handle trouble. Think of the negative way a customer sees it. The event suggests a company that doesn’t think ahead. A client is not “off base” to feel angry that you didnt care enough to make plans to support him if a disaster hit. Also, if you can’t handle disasters well, what else aren’t you handling properly?

These are just a few of the reasons everyone needs to consider disaster recovery. To learn more, see our e-guide  “Staying Alive: The Definitive Guide to Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery for Small Businesses“.

Why Small Businesses Shouldn’t Avoid Making Disaster Recovery Plans.

Why Small Businesses Shouldn’t Avoid Making Disaster Recovery Plans.

Why Small Businesses Shouldn’t Avoid Making Disaster Recovery Plans.

Entrepreneurs and small businesses, especially ones that are fairly new, often don’t think about making plans to recover in case of a disaster. However, it is the smallest business that most likely has the fewest resources to fall back on in case of disaster.

Why does this happen?

  1. It isn’t on an entrepreneur’s radar – The challenge and hurdles of starting out are what drive small business owners. The excitement that comes with getting a new client or releasing a new product are what motivates them. To be honest, things like disaster recovery plans are a little dull and aren’t part of the exciting day-to-day hustle of running a company. As a result, these issues get put on the back burner.
  2. Planning tools can seem too complex – Ideas like “risk assessment” and “business impact analysis” can be intimidating. Many SMBs may just feel the whole area is overwhelming and leave it to another day.
  3. It is perceived to be unaffordable – Many owners may believe that putting disaster recovery plans into place involves a lot of additional spending on consultants, backup hardware and more software. That isn’t true. With cloud technology and the use of a managed service provider, disaster recovery doesn’t need to be an intimidating or expensive proposition.

To learn more, see our e-guide “Staying Alive: The Definitive Guide to Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery for Small Businesses“.